Traditional rice pudding with vanilla and loads of nutmeg

It’s that time of year again, with a drop in temperature I thought it would be great to share a classic!

Creamy,warming, flavoursome and extremely moorish, good old rice pudding.

This is a very simple recipe with minimal fuss but big flavour. I prefer to bake the rice pudding as the milk reduces down and thickens, the rice becomes absorbent, sucking up any flavour you throw at it but most of all you get the best skin/crust ever!

The rice pudding can be eaten hot or cold and is delicious for breakfast with poached fruits or prunes.

Recipe:

200g pudding rice
1.2 litres of whole milk or semi skimmed
3 table spoons of sugar
1 vanilla pod split in half
Nutmeg to taste (optional)

Method:

1. Place all of the ingredients, apart from the nutmeg in a heat proof bowl or dish and stir to separate the rice.

2. Pop into a pre heated oven at 190C. Bake for 1 hour stirring occasionally to prevent the rice from sticking together.

3. One the rice is cooked and a nice caramelised skin has form on top add a good great of nutmeg. Pop back into the oven and cook for another 10-15 minutes .

4. Remove from the oven and leave to rest and thicken for 5 minutes or so before serving. This will allow the rice to settle and absorb any remaining flavour from the milk.

Top tips:

The pudding can be stored in the fridge for up to 4 days.

It taste great served with poached rhubarb or just a dollop of jam.

Try putting some pudding in a ramekin, sprinkle with sugar and glaze under a hot grill to give you that brûlée top.

The cold pudding can be formed into little balls. Pipe jam in the centre. Egg and bread crumb. Deep fry them at 190C until crisp and golden. Then roll in cinnamon sugar to create rice pudding doughnuts!

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Finger limes and citrus pearls

As a chef or Cook you never stop learning. This is why I love my job!

I was recently introduced to the finger lime by the pastry chef Colin. I had never seen or even heard of this before and was intrigued. I couldn’t wait to break it open, let alone taste it.

The lime is cylindrical in shape and has the same skin complex as a standard lime. Upon opening up the skin it bursts out with these amazing little citrus pearls, very similar to caviar.

When you bite down on the pearls they pop I your mouth release a citrus burst very similar to lime with a sharp bite. Then flavour lingers for moments after. It’s incredibly fresh.

My mind was working on over drive trying to think of all the recipes that this could be used, both sweet and savoury. It would making an amazing garnish for canapés and petit fours, giving diners a good surprise of flavour but a brilliant textural experience.

So here they are:

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Beetroot and chocolate brownies

So, I finally cracked. Having heard and seen so many variants of beetroot brownies I gave in and created a batch.

I understand the reasons for putting vegetables into cakes and I believe it can add moisture and longevity to a cake, but carrot cake has always been my limit!

@LoveBeetroot passed on their recipe for me to try via Twitter .

So I gave it a go. The results were a deliciously moist brownie with a subtle hint of beetroot but not to overpowering. What I also love about the recipe is that it’s gluten free.

The recipe can be found here on the love beetroot website:

http://www.lovebeetroot.co.uk/recipes/detail.asp?ItemID=355#.VGcUBKbfXCT

Give it a go, I would love to see your feedback and any other creations with beetroot.

Tweet them to me @JoechefBartlett

Here was my beetroot brownie

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Roasted Chicken Stock

The key to a good sauce, stew or gravy is a decent home made stock.

Check out my recipe for a roasted chicken stock. By roasting the bones it gives you a much deeper flavour and colour to the stock.

I used my stock to make a Madeira sauce but would be an amazing base for a chicken stew.

Recipe

Ingredients:

3 chicken carcasses
6 chicken wings
2 carrots
1 leek
2 white onions
4 sticks of celery
1 bay leaf
4 springs of thyme
4 parsley stalks
6 black peppercorns
Dry white or dry cider to deglaze

Method:

1. Place the chicken carcasses and wings in a roasting tin. Roast in a pre heated oven at 220C until well caramelised and crisp.

2. Place the roasted bones in a stock pot and cover with double the amount of cold water. Bring to the boil, skim and simmer gently.

3. In the mean time roughly chop the vegetables and add them to the roasting tin. Don’t worry if there is some roasted on cooking juices from the chicken. Toss the vegetables around in the chicken fat and roast until well coloured. Deglaze the roasting tin and vegetables with a splash of alcohol to retain as much flavour as possible.

4. Add the roasted vegetables and deglazed liquor to the stock pot along with the herbs, bay leaf and peppercorns. Simmer the stock for a couple of hours, skimming at regular intervals.

5. The stock should smell of roast chicken. Strain through a fine sieve into a suitable container. It can be stored in the fridge for up to a week or in the freezer for 3 to 6 months.

Top tips

Skimming the stock will prevent any fats or impurities boiling into the stock and making it go greasy.

Always replace any stock skimming’s with cold water to keep the stock level the same.

Once you have strained the stock it can be boiled down to concentrate it but also make it easier to store. I usually reduce 5 litres down to 500ml and then divide it into small containers and freeze.

A brown stock is when you roast the ingredients giving a richer and darker stock.

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